Fawning over Fawns: A Great Dane Adopts a Baby Deer and a Little Girl Finds a New Bambi Friend

Fawns are among the most adorable of baby animals.  It may not be a coincidence that the word for a baby deer, fawn, also means “to show affection.” Children universally fawn over fawns, evidenced by the enduring popularity of Bambi, a book and animated film featuring a baby deer. Adults, too, can’t resist little Bambis.

Unfortunately, baby deer are often separated from their moms in the wild. Baby deer can be orphaned by busy highways, death of the parent, and, occasionally, by something as simple as a farmer’s fence.

 

Happily ever after. After being separated from her mom, a fawn finally wriggles under a farmer's fence to a warm reunion.
Happily ever after. After being separated from her mom, a fawn finally wriggles under a farmer’s fence to a warm reunion.

 

In our first video, we see spectacular candid footage of a mother jumping a farmer’s fence, leaving behind her tiny baby. The mother does not abandon her baby, even with the humans filming her on the side of the road. She prances along the fence line until they find a way to reunite.

Bambi’s happy ending:

Newborn Deer Finds a New Friend

Way up on the “cuteness” scale our second video features a wild Bambi who simply wanders up a homeowner’s driveway to an equally adorable human child.

 

Maya is approached by a newborn deer, separated from her mother. Another happy ending, as the fawn finds Mom—after a little loving from Maya.
Maya is approached by a newborn deer, separated from her mother. Another happy ending, as the fawn finds Mom—after a little loving from Maya.

 

“We were unpacking the car from a canoe trip when this fawn stumbled across our front yard and into Maya’s arms,” writes Brad Herring, in his description for the video. “The fawn had a good sense about Maya and followed her every step. They were inseparable from the moment they met. Maya knew it needed its mother, who we believe was off eating and recuperating from the birthing, so she led it back to the woods until it finally hunkered down . . . [Later] we saw two does and two fawns in our neighbor’s yard yesterday and then again a fawn and doe in our backyard today, so we are pretty certain that she was found [by the mother]..” [1]

Warning: May be too cute for some viewers:

Great Dane Adopts a Fawn

Fawning over fawns is not limited to humans. In our third video, we witness the unusual and heartwarming relationship between an adult Great Dane and an orphaned baby deer.

In news coverage video covering the relationship on CTV News, the news anchor describes the relationship: “There is a unique bond, forming . . . between a Great Dane and a fawn. The young deer is an orphan, and the dog has become its surrogate mother.

 

Great Dane Kate adopts orphaned fawn Pipin and become a loving family. Kate an Pipin's story are soon to be published as a children's book.
Great Dane Kate adopts orphaned fawn Pipin and become a loving family. Kate an Pipin’s story are soon to be published as a children’s book.

 

In the video, the dog’s caregiver Isabelle explained, “We heard the crying. Never heard anything like that before. It sounds like a child. It’s heart wrenching.” The cries were coming from an orphaned fawn. Isabelle waited for three days for the mother doe to return. She finally brought the underweight fawn into their home.

“I put her on the dog’s bed, and that was that,” said Isabelle. “In an instant, Kate became its new mother.” Kate, the Great Dane, bonded to the fawn immediately. “The two have become almost inseparable, ever since.”

 

Even as Pipin grows into a beautiful doe, she remains faithful to mom Kate, the Great Dane.
Even as Pipin grows into a beautiful doe, she remains faithful to mom Kate, the Great Dane.

 

Interest in the pair, Kate and Pipin, brought millions of views of the video, an appearance on Ellen Degeneris and a forthcoming children’s book, appropriately titled “Kate & Pippin”.

Don’t miss this adorable film:

 

 

Is the Fawn Really an Orphan?

The Wildlife & Heritage Service cautions that apparently orphaned fawns might not be. If you find a young fawn hiding on the ground, this is its natural instinct. With its camouflage and lack of body smell, predators generally cannot spot them. The experts at the Wildlife & Heritage Service recommend, “Never try to catch it. If the fawn is lying down, enjoy the moment and then quietly walk away. Do not describe the location to others. If the fawn attempts to follow you, gently push on its shoulders until it lies down and then slowly walk away. The doe would do the same thing when she wants the fawn to stay put.” [2]

Today, man is the main predator for deer. “The doe can leave them alone for extended periods of time.”

Notes

[1] The Deer Whisperer 

[2] DNR’s Wildlife & Heritage Service 

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